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Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Nutrition Tip of the Day - January 18, 2011

nutrition tips

Today's Nutrition Tip:

Vitamin C aids in iron absorption. Not all the iron in the foods we eat is absorbed by the body. The body absorbs around 25% of the available iron from animal products and only about 10% of the iron from plant food sources. Vitamin C helps promote iron absorption. So if you are eating a food that is high in iron (like meat, poultry, beans, or dark leafy greens) be sure to eat a food containing vitamin c along with it to help your body absorb more of the iron. Good vitamin C choices are tomatoes or citrus fruits.

3 comments:

  1. I didn't know that. Now what if you are taking Iron supplements should you be taking more vitamin C to help the absorption ratio all work correctly?

    ReplyDelete
  2. In my tip, I was referring to iron in food. Supplements are a little bit different, since the drug company producing it should have already considered the bioavailability of the iron as they were formulating the supplement. Unless a doctor has prescribed iron supplements for a medical reason, it is always best to try to get your iron from foods. There is a real risk of overdosing with iron supplements, but that is unlikely to happen with real food.

    That being said, if your doctor did prescribe iron supplements, eating vitamin C rich foods, such as oranges or tomatoes, couldn't hurt.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for the tip. Vitamin C does not only help treat sicknesses, it can also help in different ways like this one.

    ReplyDelete

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Disclaimer

Jennifer Voss is a registered dietitian, licensed within the state of Ohio. On this blog, she discusses general nutrition information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for medical advice. Any specific medical or nutrition-related health concerns should be directed to a registered dietitian or medical doctor who is familiar with your medical history.