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Monday, January 31, 2011

Nutrition Tip of the Day - January 31, 2011

nutrition tips

Today's Nutrition Tip:

Bulk up your favorite convenience foods with extra veggies. From time to time, we all have to rely on convenience and processed foods. The problem is processed foods are notoriously high in fat and low in fiber. You can feel better about serving them if you boost the vegetable content. Chop up a couple cups of your favorite vegetables and add them to your favorite convenience meals. The vegetables cook while the entree is cooking. It's quick and easy.

Sunday, January 30, 2011

Nutrition Tip of the Day - January 30, 2011

nutrition tips

Today's Nutrition Tip:

Add beans to your entrees to boost the fiber content. For example, a cup of white beans adds a whopping 11 grams of fiber to the recipe. If you dislike the texture of beans, mash them up and add them to soups, casseroles, or sauces. You can't tell they are in there.

Saturday, January 29, 2011

Nutrition Tip of the Day - January 29, 2011

nutrition tips

Today's Nutrition Tip:

Replace part of the fat in baked goods with fruit and vegetable purees. Pear, apple, and even pumpkin puree can replace part of the fat in your favorite recipes. In addition you are getting the added benefit of additional fiber. Feel free to experiment. Would you believe you can add beet puree to brownies without altering the taste? It's true!

Friday, January 28, 2011

Nutrition Tip of the Day - January 28, 2011

nutrition tips

Today's Nutrition Tip:

If it's edible, don't discard the peel of fruits and vegetables. The peel of fruits and vegetables is where the majority of the fiber lies, yet many of us throw it out, missing out on the 2 grams of fiber it provides.  Just be sure to scrub it well, especially if it is a root vegetable.

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Nutrition Tip of the Day - January 27, 2011

nutrition tips

Today's Nutrition Tip:

Eat the fruit rather than drinking the juice. The peel and pulp are where the majority of the fiber is located. When you drink just the juice, your body quickly breaks it down, which causes a spike in your blood sugar. The fiber in the whole fruit helps slow the glycemic response. Plus, whole fruit is more filling than juice, so don't cheat yourself.

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Nutrition Tip of the Day - January 25, 2011

nutrition tips

Today's Nutrition Tip:

Substitute whole grain pastry flour for white flour in baked goods such as muffins, cakes,  and biscuits. Regular whole grain flour can result in a heavier end product, depending on the recipe. Whole grain pastry flour is more finely ground and results in baked goods with a texture similar to those made with white flour. By substituting a cup of whole grain pastry flour for white flour, the fiber content of the recipe is boosted by 14 grams.

Monday, January 24, 2011

Nutrition Tip of the Day - January 24, 2011

nutrition tips

Today's Nutrition Tip:

Use white varieties of whole grain bread. These are made from a white variety of wheat as opposed to the red used in traditional wheat bread. Even finicky children can't tell the difference as it is similar in texture and taste to white bread. Be sure to look for varieties that contain 2-3 grams of fiber per slice.

Sunday, January 23, 2011

Sharing Sunday - January 23, 2011

Sharing Sunday at 400 Calorie Dinners

It's Sharing Sunday!  I came across some great health and nutrition posts this week that are definitely worth sharing.  So sit back, grab a cup of tea or coffee, and enjoy!


Food with Kid Appeal has a wonderful post on how to have a healthy valentine celebration for elementary kids

If you are currently eating gluten or grain free, you will want to check out Keeper of the Home's post on sweet or savory grain free roll-ups.  The recipe uses coconut flour.  I have never cooked with that before and would love to give this recipe a try.

New Life on a Homestead has a thought-provoking article on entertaining kids without electronics.  With obesity on the rise in children, this is a timely read for all parents.

Kitchen Stewardship shares a pasta recipe that features a white sauce made from beans.  I really want to try this one out.  I am always on the lookout for good bean recipes.

Find any great healthy recipes or nutrition posts this week?  Be sure to link up to them in the comments section.

Nutrition Tip of the Day - January 23, 2011

nutrition tips

Today's Nutrition Tip:

Read bread labels.  Food manufacturers love to slap the “wheat” label on bread. Well technically most bread is made from wheat (unless you are getting into gluten-free varieties). Most wheat breads don’t offer much more benefit than white bread. Manufacturers are betting that consumers will see “wheat” on the label and assume it is healthy.  You need to be an informed consumer.  Look for “whole grain” or “whole wheat” as the first ingredient on the packaging. If the first ingredient is white flour, put it back. Also look at the fiber content to get the whole story. True whole grain bread will have at least 2 grams of fiber per slice, if not more.

Saturday, January 22, 2011

Nutrition Tip of the Day - January 22, 2011

nutrition tips

Today's Nutrition Tip:

Switch to whole grain pasta. The average pasta is made from refined white flour and contains little to no fiber.  In contrast, whole grain pasta contains 5 or more grams of fiber in a serving.  Whole grain fiber does have a slightly nutty taste and a different texture. If this is not to your liking, be sure to look for the white whole grain varieties. An alternative would be to start by using a mixture of half regular pasta and half whole wheat pasta. You can increase the amount of whole wheat pasta as you become accustomed to the taste.
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Disclaimer

Jennifer Voss is a registered dietitian, licensed within the state of Ohio. On this blog, she discusses general nutrition information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for medical advice. Any specific medical or nutrition-related health concerns should be directed to a registered dietitian or medical doctor who is familiar with your medical history.